Blepharophimosis, Ptosis, and Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome Treatment News and Symptoms Information

What is Blepharophimosis, Ptosis, and Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome – BPES?

(Symptoms, Causes & Treatment)

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, Blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES) is identified as a condition which primarily affects development of the eyelids. People with BPES have a narrowing of the eye opening (blepharophimosis), droopy eyelids (ptosis), and an upward fold of the skin of the lower eyelid near the inner corner of the eye (epicanthus inversus). There may also be a noticeable increase in distance between the inner corners of the eyes (telecanthus). Because of these eyelid abnormalities, the eyelids cannot open fully, and vision may be limited.

There are two types of BPES, which are distinguished by their signs and symptoms. Both types I and II include the eyelid malformations and other facial features. Type I is also associated with an early loss of ovarian function (primary ovarian insufficiency) in women, which causes their menstrual periods to become less frequent and eventually stop before age 40.

See below for updated news and information regarding Blepharophimosis, Ptosis, and Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome including new medical research, treatment options and advancements. 

Latest Blepharophimosis, Ptosis, and Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome Treatment News and Research

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