Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Symptoms, Causes and Treatment Information

What is Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease – CMT? (Definition)

(Symptoms, Causes & Treatment)

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a common inherited neurological disorder which affects approximately 1 in 2,500 people in the United States. The disease is named for the three physicians who first identified it in 1886 – Jean-Martin Charcot and Pierre Marie in Paris, France, and Howard Henry Tooth in Cambridge, England. CMT, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) or peroneal muscular atrophy, comprises a group of disorders that affect peripheral nerves. The peripheral nerves lie outside the brain and spinal cord and supply the muscles and sensory organs in the limbs. Disorders that affect the peripheral nerves are called peripheral neuropathies.

 

Signs and Symptoms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

Symptoms may include weakness of the foot and lower leg muscles, which may result in foot drop and a high-stepped gait with frequent tripping or falls. Also, foot deformities, such as high arches and hammertoes are also characteristic due to weakness of the small muscles in the feet. In addition, the lower legs may take on an “inverted champagne bottle” appearance due to the loss of muscle bulk. As the disease progresses, weakness and muscle atrophy may occur in the hands, resulting in difficulty with carrying out fine motor skills.

 

See below for updated news and information regarding Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease including new medical research, treatment options and advancements. 

Latest Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Research – Treatment News, Discoveries and Findings

No recent news regarding Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease is available. 

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Clinical Trials – Investigational Therapies

For information on current clinical trials, visit www.clinicaltrials.gov. This is a searchable registry and results database of federally and privately supported clinical trials taking place in the U.S and abroad. ClinicalTrials.gov provides information about a trial’s purpose, who may participate, locations, and phone numbers. This information should be used in conjunction with advice from health care professionals.

For information about clinical trials being conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, contact the NIH Patient Recruitment Office:

Toll Free: (800) 411-1222
TTY: (866) 411-1010
Email: prpl@mail.cc.nih.gov

For information about clinical trials conducted in Europe, visit: https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search

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